Pyrantel Pamoate (Small Animals)

(pi-ran-tel pam-oh-ate)
Category: Antiparasitic Agent
Other Names for this Medication: Nemex 2®
Common Dosage Forms: Veterinary: Tablets (chewable): 22.7 mg & 113.5 mg; Oral Suspension: 2.27 mg/mL & 4.54 mg/mL. Human: Oral Suspension: 50 mg/mL; Soft-gel Oral Capsules: 62.5 mg; Tablets: 180 mg & 720.5 mg (chewable).

This information sheet does not contain all available information for this medication. It is to help answer commonly asked questions and help you give the medication safely and

effectively to your animal. If you have other questions or need more information about this medication, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

Key Information

X May be given with or without food.

X If using oral liquid suspension, shake well before each use.

X Usually tolerated well. Rarely, some animals may vomit after receiving pyrantel on an empty stomach. If this occurs, giving the dose with food may help.

X Dose is usually repeated. Follow your veterinarian’s recommendation for best control of parasites.

How is this medication useful?

Pyrantel pamoate is given by mouth in dog, cats, small mammals (eg, rabbits, rodents), and birds to treat roundworms and hook- worms.

The FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration) has approved this drug for use in dogs and humans. The FDA does allow veterinarians to prescribe and use products containing this drug in different species or for other conditions in certain situations. You and your veterinar- ian can discuss why this drug is the most appropriate choice.

What should I tell my veterinarian to see if this medication can be safely given?

Many things might affect how well this drug will work in your animal. Be sure to discuss the following with your veterinarian so together you can make the best treatment decisions.
XXOther drugs can interact with pyrantel pamoate, so be sure to tell

your veterinarian and pharmacist what medications (including vitamins, supplements, or herbal therapies) you give your animal, including the amount and time you give each.

XXTell your veterinarian about any conditions or diseases your pet may have now or has had in the past.

XXIf your animal has been treated for the same disease or condition in the past, tell your veterinarian about the treatment and how well it did or didn’t work.

XXIf your animal is pregnant or nursing, talk to your veterinarian about the risks of using this drug.

XXTell your veterinarian and pharmacist about any medication side effects (including allergic reactions, lack of appetite, diarrhea, itching, hair loss) your pet has developed in the past.

When should this medication not be used or be used very carefully?

No drug is 100% safe in all patients, but your veterinarian will discuss with you any specific concerns about using this drug in your animal.

This drug SHOULD NOT be used in patients:XXThat are allergic to it.

This drug should be used WITH CAUTION in patients:XXThat are weak and frail.

If your animal matches either of these conditions, talk to your veter- inarian about the possible risks of using the medication versus the benefits that it might have.

What are the side effects of this medication?

Side effects that usually are not serious include:

XXVomiting. If your pet vomits after receiving pyrantel pamoate, give the medication with food.

You don’t have to be overly concerned if you see this unless it is severe, worsens, or continues to be a problem. Contact your veteri- narian if this happens.

If my pet gets too much of this medication (an overdose), what should I do?

Overdoses of pyrantel pamoate can cause problems if given over a period of time. If you witness or suspect an overdose, and your an- imal is showing any unusual symptoms, contact your veterinarian or an animal poison control center for further advice. Animal poison control centers that are open 24 hours a day include: Pet Poison HELPLINE (855-764-7661) and ASPCA Animal Poison Control Cen- ter (888-426-4435); a consultation fee is charged for these services.

How should this medication be given?

For this medication to work, give it exactly as your veterinarian has prescribed. It’s a good idea to always check the prescription label to be sure you are giving the drug correctly.

XXThe drug may be given either with food or on an empty stomach. If your pet vomits or acts sick after receiving the drug on an empty stomach, try giving the next dose with food or a small treat. If vomiting continues, contact your veterinarian.

XXIf using liquid forms of this medication, shake the bottle well before each use.

XXMeasure dosages carefully. Your veterinarian or pharmacist can help by providing special measuring spoons or syringes.

XXIf you have difficulty getting your animal to take the medicine, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist for tips to help with dosing and reducing the stress of medication time.

XXThis medication can be given for various lengths of time. Be sure you understand how long and how often your veterinarian wants you to continue giving this medication to your pet. Prescription refills may be necessary before the therapy will be complete. Before stopping this medication, talk to your veterinarian, as there may be important reasons to continue its use.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

What should I do if I miss giving a dose of this medication?

If you miss a dose, give it when you remember and then wait the amount of time between doses recommended by your veterinarian before giving another dose. Do not double-up or give extra doses.

How should I store this medication?

XXStore this medication in the original prescription container or an approved dosage reminder container (ie, pill minder) at room temperature and protected from light.

XXIf your veterinarian or pharmacist has made (compounded) a special formulation for your animal, follow the storage recommendations and expiration date for the product.

XXKeep away from children and other animals.
Can handling this medication be hazardous to me, my family, or

other pets?

There are no specific precautions required when handling this med- ication unless you are allergic to it. Wash your hands after handling any medication.

How should I dispose of this medication if I don’t use it all?

XXDo not flush this medication down the toilet or wash it down the sink. If a community drug “take-back” program is available, use this option. If there is no take-back program, mix the drug with coffee grounds or cat litter (to make it undesirable to children and animals and unrecognizable to people who might go through your trash), place the mixture in a sealable plastic bag to keep it from leaking out, and throw the bag out with the regular trash.

XXDo not save left over medication for future use or give it to others to use.

What other information is important for this medication?

XXUse of this drug may not be allowed in certain animal competitions. Check rules and regulations before entering your animal in a competition while this medication is being administered.

If you have any other questions or concerns about this medica- tion, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

Pyrantel Pamoate (Horses)

(pi-ran-tel pam-oh-ate)
Category: Antiparasitic Agentt
Other Names for this Medication: Strongid T®
Common Dosage Forms: Veterinary: Oral paste: 23.6 grams of pyrantel/20 mL oral syringe (180 mg pyrantel/mL); Oral suspension: 50 mg/mL. Human: None appropriate for horses.

This information sheet does not contain all available information for this medication. It is to help answer commonly asked questions and help you give the medication safely and

effectively to your animal. If you have other questions or need more information about this medication, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

Key Information

X If using a suspension formulation, shake container well before each use and protect from sunlight.

X Usually causes no side effects.

How is this medication useful?

The FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration) has approved pyrantel pamoate for use in horses and ponies for the removal and control of infections of mature small and large strongyles, pinworms, and large roundworms. Parasite resistance is an ongoing problem. Consult your veterinarian for assistance in the diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasites in your animal. You and your veterinarian can discuss why this drug is the most appropriate choice.

What should I tell my veterinarian to see if this medication can be safely given?

Many things might affect how well this drug will work in your animal. Be sure to discuss the following with your veterinarian so together you can make the best treatment decisions.

XXOther drugs can interact with this drug, so be sure to tell your veterinarian and pharmacist what medications (including vitamins, supplements, or herbal therapies) you give your animal, including the amount and time you give each.

XXTell your veterinarian about any conditions or diseases your animal may have now or has had in the past.

XXIf your animal has been treated for the same disease or condition in the past, tell your veterinarian about the treatment and how well it did or didn’t work.

XXIf your animal is pregnant or nursing, talk to your veterinarian about the risks of using this drug.

XXTell your veterinarian and pharmacist about any medication side effects (including allergic reactions, lack of appetite, diarrhea, itching, hair loss) your animal has developed in the past.

When should this medication not be used or be used very carefully?

No drug is 100% safe in all patients, but your veterinarian will discuss with you any specific concerns about using this drug in your animal.

This drug SHOULD NOT be used in horses:
XXThat are allergic to it.
XXThat are to be used for human consumption. This drug should be used WITH CAUTION in horses:XXThat are old, weak, or frail.

If your animal has any of these conditions or signs, talk to your veterinarian about the potential risks versus benefits.

What are the side effects of this medication?

When given to horses as directed on the label, pyrantel pamoate usually causes no side effects. If you have concerns about your animal after medicating, contact your veterinarian.

If my animal gets too much of this medication (an overdose), what should I do?

If you witness or suspect an overdose, contact your veterinarian or an animal poison control center for further advice. Animal poison control centers that are open 24 hours a day include: Pet Poison HELPLINE (855-764-7661) and ASPCA Animal Poison Control Cen- ter (888-426-4435); a consultation fee is charged for these services.

How should this medication be given?

For this medication to work, give it exactly as your veterinarian has prescribed. It’s a good idea to always check the prescription or package label to be sure you are giving the drug correctly.

When using the oral paste:

XXThe syringe has 4 weight mark increments. Each weight mark indicates the recommended dose for 300 lb of body weight. Determine the correct amount of paste to use by rounding up your horse’s weight to the mark that is closest to its weight. Using the screw-gauge on the syringe, “dial in” the correct amount to give.

XXAfter removing the cap, the paste should be deposited on
the back of your horse’s tongue. Most horses will accept the medication when you place the nozzle end of the syringe into the corner of the mouth and point the syringe towards the back of the mouth while pressing the plunger to release the medication onto the tongue. Raising your horse’s head sometimes helps in swallowing.

XXIf the recommended dose for your horse uses only part of the paste in the syringe, replace the cap on the syringe nozzle and store as recommended until next dosing.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

When using the oral liquid suspension:

XXThe product must be shaken thoroughly before every use.

XXDo not expose the medication (alone or after mixing with water) to direct sunlight.

XXMay be administered by means of a stomach tube, dose
syringe, or by mixing into the feed. Stomach Tube: Measure the appropriate dosage of oral suspension and mix in the desired quantity of water. Give immediately following mixing. Do not attempt to store diluted suspension. Dose Syringe: Draw the appropriate amount of suspension into the dose syringe and administer. Feed: Mix the appropriate dosage of suspension in the normal grain ration. Fasting prior to or following treatment is not required.

XXLiquid forms of this medication must be measured carefully. Your veterinarian or pharmacist can help by providing special measuring spoons or syringes.

XXIf you have difficulty getting your horse to accept the medicine, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist for tips to help with dosing and reducing the stress of medication time.

XXThis medication can be given for various lengths of time, so be sure you understand how long your veterinarian wants you to continue giving this medication to your horse.

What should I do if I miss giving a dose of this medication?

If you miss a dose, give it when you remember and then wait the amount of time between doses recommended by your veterinarian before giving another dose. Do not double-up or give extra doses.

How should I store this medication?

XXStore this medication in the original container at room temperature and protected from light.

XXIf your veterinarian or pharmacist has made (compounded) a special formulation for your animal, follow the storage recommendations and expiration date for the product.

XXKeep away from children and other animals.

Can handling this medication be hazardous to me, my family, or other pets?

There are no specific precautions required when handling this med- ication unless you are allergic to it. Wash your hands after handling any medication.

How should I dispose of this medication if I don’t use it all?

XXDo not flush this medication down the toilet or wash it down the sink. If a community drug “take-back” program is available, use this option. If there is no take-back program, mix the drug with coffee grounds or cat litter (to make it undesirable to children and animals and unrecognizable to people who might go through your trash), place the mixture in a sealable plastic bag to keep it from leaking out, and throw the bag out with the regular trash.

XXDo not save left over medication for future use or give it to others to use.

What other information is important for this medication?

XXUse of this drug may not be allowed in certain animal competitions. Check rules and regulations before entering your animal in a competition while this medication is being administered.

If you have any other questions or concerns about this medica- tion, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

Ivermectin with Pyrantel Pamoate (Dogs)

(eye-ver-mek-tin with pi-ran-tel pam-oh-ate)
Category: Antiparasitic
Other Names for this Medication: Heartgard® Plus, Heartshield Plus®, Iverhart Plus®, Tri-Heart Plus®, Pettrust Plus®Common Dosage Forms: Veterinary: Dogs: Chewable Oral tablets: Ivermectin/Pyrantel: 68 mcg/57 mg, 136 mcg/114 mg, & 272 mcg/227 mg. Human: None.

This information sheet does not contain all available information for this medication. It is to help answer commonly asked questions and help you give the medication safely and

effectively to your animal. If you have other questions or need more information about this medication, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

Key Information

X Antiparasitic combination used in dogs to prevent heartworm infection and for the treatment and control of roundworms and hookworms.

X Can be added to a small amount of food. It is best if the dog chews the tablet before swallowing. If your dog normally swallows treats whole (without chewing), the tablet may be broken into pieces and the pieces fed to the dog.

X Overdoses can be serious; keep flavored, chewable tablets out of reach of children and animals.

X Usually well tolerated. If you notice neurologic signs such as coma, weakness, clumsiness, dilated (ie, big) pupils, trembling, excessive salivation (ie, drooling), or the dog pressing its head against the wall, contact your veterinarian immediately.

X Dispose of unused product carefully; it can be quite toxic to fish and wildlife.

How is this medication useful?

Ivermectin with pyrantel pamoate is used in dogs to prevent heart- worm disease and for the treatment and control of roundworms and hookworms.

The FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration) has approved this drug for use in dogs. The FDA allows veterinarians to prescribe and use products containing this drug combination in different species or for other conditions in certain situations. You and your veterinarian can discuss why this drug is the most appropriate choice.

What should I tell my veterinarian to see if this medication can be safely given?

Many things might affect how well this drug will work in your animal. Be sure to discuss the following with your veterinarian so together you can make the best treatment decisions.

XXOther drugs can interact with this drug combination, so be sure to tell your veterinarian and pharmacist what medications (including vitamins, supplements, or herbal therapies) you give your animal, including the amount and time you give each.

XXTell your veterinarian about any conditions or diseases your pet may have now or may have had in the past.

XXIf your animal has been treated for the same disease or condition in the past, tell your veterinarian about the treatment and how well it did or didn’t work.

XXIf your animal is pregnant or nursing, talk to your veterinarian about the risks of using this drug. Ivermectin with pyrantel is thought to be safe to use during pregnancy.

XXTell your veterinarian and pharmacist about any medication side effects (including allergic reactions, lack of appetite, diarrhea, itching, hair loss) your animal has developed in the past.

When should this medication not be used or be used very carefully?

No drug is 100% safe in all patients, but your veterinarian will discuss with you any specific concerns about using this drug in your animal.

This drug SHOULD NOT be used in dogs that:
XXAre allergic to pyrantel, ivermectin or other avermectin drugs (eg,

selamectin, moxidectin).
This drug should be used WITH CAUTION:

XXIn puppies less than 6 weeks of age.

XXDogs must be tested for heartworm infection before being given ivermectin-containing products. Dogs infected with heartworms are at risk for having a serious adverse reaction (caused by
the rapid die off of immature heartworms) following drug administration.

If your dog matches any of these, talk to your veterinarian about the possible risks of using the medication versus the benefits that it might have.

What are the side effects of this medication?

When used as directed on the label, side effects are rare.

Reported side effects that usually are not serious include:

XXVomiting, diarrhea.

You don’t have to be overly concerned if you see either of these unless they are severe, persistent, or worsen. Contact your veteri- narian if this happens.

Side effects that may be serious or indicate a serious problem:

XXCentral nervous system toxicity (especially in those breeds that have the ABCB1-1∆ [MDR1] mutation). Toxic signs can include: coma, weakness, clumsiness, blindness, dilated (big) pupils, trembling, excessive drooling or foaming, or the animal pressing its head against the wall.

XXBlindness or enlarged pupils can occur when doses are high, especially in susceptible breeds of dogs.

If you see any of these, contact your veterinarian immediately.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

If my animal gets too much of this medication (an overdose), what should I do?

Overdoses of this drug combination can be serious and cause vomiting, diarrhea, stumbling, lethargy (ie, tiredness, lack of ener- gy), rapid heartbeat, excessive drooling, dilation of pupils, coma, and seizures. If you witness or suspect an overdose, contact your veterinarian or an animal poison control center for further advice. Animal poison control centers that are open 24 hours a day include:Pet Poison HELPLINE (855-764-7661) and ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (888-426-4435); a consultation fee is charged for these services.

How should this medication be given?

For this medication to work, give it exactly as your veterinarian has prescribed. It’s a good idea to always check the prescription label to be sure you are giving the drug correctly.

XXRemove only 1 chewable tablet at a time from the foil-backed blister card. Return the card with the remaining chewable tablets to its box to protect the product from light.

XXIt is best if the dog chews the tablet before swallowing. If your dog normally swallows treats whole (without chewing), the tablet may be broken into pieces and the pieces fed to the dog.

XXBe sure your dog eats the complete dose. Watch your dog for a few minutes after dosing to be sure that part of the dose is not rejected or spit out. If it is suspected that any of the dose has not been eaten, redosing is recommended.

XXIf you have difficulty getting your animal to take the medicine, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist for tips to help with dosing and to reduce the stress of medication time.

XXThis medication can be given for various lengths of time. Be sure you understand how long your veterinarian wants you
to continue giving this medication. Prescription refills may be necessary before the therapy will be complete. Before stopping this medication, talk to your veterinarian, as there may be important reasons to continue its use.

What should I do if I miss giving a dose of this medication?

If you miss a dose, give it when you remember and then wait the amount of time between doses recommended by your veterinarian before giving another dose. Do not double up or give extra doses.

When using ivermectin for heartworm prevention: If more than
8 weeks have passed without giving this medication, start giving the drug as soon as you remember. After that, continue giving the medication monthly, but make sure to have your animal tested for heartworm infection 6 months later, as your dog may have become infected during the time the medication was not given.

How should I store this medication?

XXStore this medication in the original prescription container or an approved dosage-reminder container (ie, pill minder) at room temperature and protected from light.

XXKeep away from children and other animals, especially the chewable or flavored forms of the drug.

Can handling this medication be hazardous to me, my family, or other pets?

There are no specific precautions required when handling small an- imal products of this medication unless you are allergic to it. Wash your hands after handling any medication.

How should I dispose of this medication if I don’t use it all?

XXDispose of ivermectin with pyrantel carefully as it is can be toxic to fish, turtles, and other wildlife.

XXDo not flush this medication down the toilet or wash it down the sink. If a community drug “take-back” program is available, use this option. If there is no take-back program, mix the drug with coffee grounds or cat litter (to make it undesirable to children and animals and unrecognizable to people who might go through your trash), place the mixture in a sealable plastic bag to keep it from leaking out, and throw the bag out with the regular trash.

XXDo not save leftover medication for future use or give it to others to use.

What other information is important for this medication?

XXUse of this drug may not be allowed in certain animal competitions. Check rules and regulations before entering your animal in a competition while this medication is being administered.

If you have any other questions or concerns about this medica- tion, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

Ivermectin with Pyrantel Pamoate and Praziquantel (Dogs)

(eye-ver-mek-tin with pi-ran-tel pam-oh-ate and pra-zi-kwon-tel)
Category: Antiparasitic
Other Names for this Medication: Iverhart Max®, QuadriGuard®
Common Dosage Forms: Veterinary: Dogs: Chewable Oral Tablets: Ivermectin/Pyrantel/Praziquantel: 34 mcg/28.5 mg/28.5 mg, 68 mcg/57 mg/57 mg, 136 mcg/114 mg/114 mg, & 272 mcg/228 mg/228 mg.Human: None.

This information sheet does not contain all available information for this medication. It is to help answer commonly asked questions and help you give the medication safely and

effectively to your animal. If you have other questions or need more information about this medication, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

Key Information

X Antiparasitic combination that is used in dogs to prevent heartworm disease and for the treatment and control of roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms.

X Can be offered to the dog by hand or added to a small amount of dog food. It is best if the dog chews the tablet before swallowing. If your dog normally swallows treats whole (without chewing), you can break the tablet into pieces and feed the pieces to the dog.

X Overdoses can be serious; keep chewable and flavored tablets out of reach of children and animals.

X Usually well tolerated. If you see any signs of central nervous system toxicity (see adverse effects section below), contact your veterinarian immediately.

X Dispose of unused product carefully; it is toxic to fish and wildlife.

How is this medication useful?

The drug combination of ivermectin, pyrantel pamoate, and prazi- quantel is used in dogs to prevent heartworm disease and for the treatment and control of roundworms, hookworms, and tape- worms. The FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration) has approved this drug for use in dogs. The FDA allows veterinarians to prescribe and use products containing this drug in different species or for other conditions in certain situations. You and your veterinarian can discuss why this drug is the most appropriate choice.

What should I tell my veterinarian to see if this medication can be safely given?

Many things might affect how well this drug will work in your animal. Be sure to discuss the following with your veterinarian so together you can make the best treatment decisions.

XXOther medications can interact with this drug combination, so be sure to tell your veterinarian and pharmacist what medications (including vitamins, supplements, or herbal therapies) you give your animal, including the amount and time you give each.

XXTell your veterinarian about any conditions or diseases your pet may have now or may have had in the past.

XXIf your animal has been treated for the same disease or condition in the past, tell your veterinarian about the treatment and how well it did or didn’t work.

XXIf your animal is pregnant or nursing, talk to your veterinarian about the risks of using this drug. Ivermectin with pyrantel is considered safe to use during pregnancy; however, the safe use of the combination product that also contains praziquantel has not been evaluated.

effects (including allergic reactions, lack of appetite, diarrhea, itching, hair loss) your pet has developed in the past.

When should this medication not be used or be used very carefully?

No drug is 100% safe in all patients, but your veterinarian will discuss with you any specific concerns about using this drug in your animal.

This drug SHOULD NOT be used:
XXIn dogs that are allergic to pyrantel, praziquantel, ivermectin, or

other avermectin drugs.
This drug should be used WITH CAUTION:

XXIn dogs under 8 weeks old.
XXIn sick, weak, frail, or underweight dogs, and dogs weighing less

than 10 lb.

XXIn animals that have not first tested negative for heartworm infection. When ivermectin is given to animals with immature heartworms, a severe reaction can occur.

In any of these cases, talk to your veterinarian about the possible risks versus benefits of the medication.

What are the side effects of this medication?

When the drug is used as directed, side effects are uncommon.

Reported side effects, which are usually not serious, include:

XXVomiting, diarrhea, decreased appetite, licking lips, and belching (burping).

XXTiredness, lack of energy, limpness, salivation (drooling), and shaking.

You do not have to be overly concerned if you see any of these unless they are severe, are persistent, or worsen. Contact your veterinarian if this happens.

If my pet gets too much of this medication (an overdose), what should I do?

Overdoses of ivermectin containing products can be very serious, especially in dog breeds that may have the ABCB1-1∆ (MDR-1) genetic mutation. Signs of toxicity can include include: coma, seizures, weakness, clumsiness, dilated (big) pupils, trembling, excessive salivation/drooling/foaming, lethargy (tiredness, lack of energy), dog pressing its head against the wall, and blindness. If you witness or suspect an overdose, contact your veterinarian or an animal poison control center for further advice. Animal poison control centers that are open 24 hours a day include: Pet Poison HELPLINE (855-764-7661) and ASPCA Animal Poison Control Cen- ter (888-426-4435); a consultation fee is charged for these services.

XXTell your veterinarian and pharmacist about any medication side
©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

How should this medication be given?

For this medication to work, give it exactly as your veterinarian has prescribed. It’s a good idea to always check the prescription label to be sure you are giving the drug correctly.
XXRemove only one chewable tablet at a time from the foil-backed

blister card. Return the card with the remaining chewable tablets to its box to protect the product from light.

XXBecause most dogs like to eat these tablets, they can be offered by hand or be added to a small amount of dog food. It is best if the dog chews the tablet before swallowing. If your dog normally swallows treats whole (without chewing), you can break the tablet into pieces and feed the pieces to the dog.

XXBe sure your dog eats the complete dose. Watch your dog for a few minutes after dosing to be sure that part of the dose is not rejected or spit out. If it is suspected that any of the dose has not been eaten, giving another dose is recommended.

XXIf you have difficulty getting your animal to take the medicine, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist for tips to help with dosing and to reduce the stress of medication time.

XXThis medication is given on a monthly basis. Be sure you understand how long your veterinarian wants you to continue giving this medication (eg, year round or specific months). Prescription refills may be necessary before the therapy will
be complete. Before stopping this medication, talk to your veterinarian, as there may be important reasons to continue its use.

What should I do if I miss giving a dose of this medication?

If you miss a dose, give it when you remember and then wait the amount of time between doses recommended by your veterinarian before giving another dose. Do not double up or give extra doses. When using this drug combination for heartworm prevention: If more than 8 weeks in a row have passed without giving the medica- tion, start giving it as soon as you remember and then give every 30 days. If this occurs, it is recommend to have your animal tested for heartworm infection 6 months later to ensure the break in treat- ment did not cause your animal to become infected.

How should I store this medication?

XXStore this medication in the original prescription container or an approved dosage reminder container (ie, pill minder) at room temperature and protected from light.

XXKeep away from children and other animals, especially the chewable or flavored forms of the drug.

Can handling this medication be hazardous to me, my family, or other pets?

There are no specific precautions required when handling this med- ication unless you are allergic to it. Wash your hands after handling any medication.

How should I dispose of this medication if I don’t use it all?

XXDispose of ivermectin with pyrantel and praziquantel carefully as it is toxic to fish, turtles, and other wildlife.

XXDo not flush this medication down the toilet or wash it down the sink. If a community drug “take-back” program is available, use this option. If there is no take-back program, mix the drug with coffee grounds or cat litter (to make it undesirable to children and animals and unrecognizable to people who might go through your trash), place the mixture in a sealable plastic bag to keep it from leaking out, and throw the bag out with the regular trash.

XXDo not save leftover medication for future use or give it to others to use.

What other information is important for this medication?

XXUse of this drug may not be allowed in certain animal competitions. Check rules and regulations before entering your animal in a competition while this medication is being administered.

If you have any other questions or concerns about this medica- tion, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

Praziquantel with Pyrantel Pamoate

(pra-zi-kwon-tel with pi-ran-tel pam-oh-ate)
Category: Antiparasitic
Other Names for this Medication: Drontal®. There are many more trade name products for this drug combi- nation.
Common Dosage Forms: Veterinary: Tablets for Cats: Praziquantel/Pyrantel Pamoate 13.6 mg/54.3 mg, 18.2 mg/72.6 mg, & 27.2 mg/108.6 mg. Chewable Tablets for Dogs: Praziquantel/Pyrantel Pamoate 30 mg/30 mg & 114 mg/114 mg. Human: None.

This information sheet does not contain all available information for this medication. It is to help answer commonly asked questions and help you give the medication safely and

effectively to your animal. If you have other questions or need more information about this medication, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

Key Information

X Combination oral dewormer that treats roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms.

X Can be given with or without food; tablets may be crushed or mixed with food. Do not withhold food after dosing.

X Side effects are rare if the drug is given by mouth, but loss of appetite, drooling (in cats), vomiting, lethargy (lack of energy), and diarrhea are possible.

X Dead worms are not typically seen in feces after treatment.

How is this medication useful?

Combination products that contain praziquantel with pyrantel pa- moate are used in dogs, cats, and other small animals to treat and control roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms.

The FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration) has approved this drug combination for use in dogs and cats. The FDA does allow veterinar- ians to prescribe and use products containing this drug in different species or for other conditions in certain situations. You and your veterinarian can discuss why this drug is the most appropriate choice.

What should I tell my veterinarian to see if this medication can be safely given?

Many things can possibly affect the way this drug combination will work in your animal. Be sure to discuss the following with your vet- erinarian so together you can make the best treatment decisions.XXOther drugs can affect the way these drugs work, so be sure

to tell your veterinarian and pharmacist what medications (including vitamins, supplements, or herbal therapies) you give your animal, including the amount and time you give each.

XXTell your veterinarian about any conditions or diseases your pet may have now or has had in the past.

XXIf your animal has been treated for the same disease or condition in the past, tell your veterinarian about the treatment and how well it did or didn’t work.

XXIf your animal is pregnant or nursing, talk to your veterinarian about the risks of using this drug.

XXTell your veterinarian and pharmacist about any medication side effects (including allergic reactions, lack of appetite, diarrhea, itching, hair loss) your pet has developed in the past.

When should this medication not be used or be used very carefully?

No drug is 100% safe in all patients, but your veterinarian will discuss with you any specific concerns about using this drug in your animal.

This drug SHOULD NOT be used in:

XXAnimals that are allergic to either praziquantel or pyrantel.

XXPuppies fewer than 12 weeks old or weighing under 6 lb. Some products may be safe for these animals; ask your veterinarian before treating with these products.

XXKittens fewer than 8 weeks old or weighing under than 2 lb. Some products may be safe for these animals; ask your veterinarian before treating with these products.

If your pet has any of these conditions, talk to your veterinarian about the potential risks versus benefits.

What are the side effects of this medication?

When given by mouth side effects are rare.

Side effects that are not serious include:

XXLoss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea.

XXSalivation (drooling) in cats.

XXLack of energy, incoordination (eg, stumbling, clumsiness), weakness.

You don’t have to be overly concerned if you see any of these unless they are severe, worsen, or continue to be a problem. Contact your veterinarian if this happens.

If my pet gets too much of this medication (an overdose), what should I do?

If you witness or suspect an overdose, contact your veterinarian or an animal poison control center for further advice. Animal poison control centers that are open 24 hours a day include: Pet Poison HELPLINE (855-764-7661) and ASPCA Animal Poison Control Cen- ter (888-426-4435); a consultation fee is charged for these servicess.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

How should this medication be given?

For this medication to work, give it exactly as your veterinarian has prescribed. It’s a good idea to always check the prescription label to be sure you are giving the drug correctly.
XXThe drug may be given either with food or on an empty stomach.

If your animal vomits shortly after getting the dose, contact your veterinarian for instructions. Do not withhold food after treatment.

XXIf your animal is large, your veterinarian may have you give it several tablets at one time. Make sure that your animal swallows all of the medication.

XXYour veterinarian may recommend that you repeat the treatment a few weeks later to make sure all of the parasites have been eliminated.

XXWatch your animal for a few minutes after giving the medication to make sure the entire treatment is swallowed.

XXIf you have difficulty getting your animal to take the medicine, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist for tips to help with dosing and reducing the stress of medication time.

What should I do if I miss giving a dose of this medication?

If you miss a dose, give it when you remember and then wait the amount of time between doses recommended by your veterinarian before giving another dose. Do not double-up or give extra doses.

How should I store this medication?

XXStore this medication in the original prescription bottle or an approved dosage reminder container (ie, pill minder) at room temperature and protected from light.

XXKeep away from children and other animals.

Can handling this medication be hazardous to me, my family, or other pets?

There are no specific precautions required when handling this med- ication unless you are allergic to it. Wash your hands after handling any medication.

How should I dispose of this medication if I don’t use it all?

XXDo not flush this medication down the toilet or wash it down the sink. If a community drug “take-back” program is available, use this option. If there is no take-back program, mix the drug with coffee grounds or cat litter (to make it undesirable to children and animals and unrecognizable to people who might go through your trash), place the mixture in a sealable plastic bag to keep it from leaking out, and throw the bag out with the regular trash.

XXDo not save left over medication for future use or give it to others to use.

What other information is important for this medication?

XXFor most animals, the dead worms are digested; however, if your animal had many tapeworms, some may be seen in the feces.

XXUse of this drug may not be allowed in certain animal competitions. Check rules and regulations before entering your animal in a competition while this medication is being administered.

If you have any other questions or concerns about this medica- tion, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

Praziquantel with Pyrantel Pamoate and Febantel (Dogs)

(pra-zi-kwon-tel with pi-ran-tel pam-oh-ate and feh-ban-tel)
Category: Antiparasitic
Other Names for this Medication: Drontal® Plus
Common Dosage Forms: Veterinary: Tablets & chewable tablets for Dogs: Praziquantel/Pyrantel Pamoate/Febantel: 22.7mg/22.7mg/113.4mg, 68mg/68mg/340.2 mg, & 136mg/136mg/680.4 mg.Human: None.

This information sheet does not contain all available information for this medication. It is to help answer commonly asked questions and help you give the medication safely and

effectively to your animal. If you have other questions or need more information about this medication, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

Key Information

X Combination oral dewormer for dogs that is effective for roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, and tapeworms.

X May give with or without food. Can be crushed and mixed into food. Do not withhold food after dosing.

X Usually tolerated well by dogs. Vomiting or loose stools (diarrhea) are possible.

X Dead worms not typically seen in feces after treatment.

How is this medication useful?

Combination products that contain praziquantel, pyrantel pa- moate, and febantel are used in dogs to control roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, and tapeworms.

The FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration) has approved this drug combination for use in dogs. The FDA does allow veterinarians to prescribe and use this product in different species or for other con- ditions in certain situations. You and your veterinarian can discuss why this drug is the most appropriate choice.

What should I tell my veterinarian to see if this medication can be safely given?

Many things can affect the way this drug combination will work in your animal. Be sure to discuss the following with your veterinarian so together you can make the best treatment decisions.

XXOther drugs can affect the way these drugs work, so be sure
to tell your veterinarian and pharmacist what medications (including vitamins, supplements, or herbal therapies) you give your animal, including the amount and time you give each.

XXTell your veterinarian about any conditions or diseases your pet may have now or has had in the past.

XXIf your animal has been treated for the same disease or condition in the past, tell your veterinarian about the treatment and how well it did or didn’t work.

XXIf your animal is pregnant or nursing, talk to your veterinarian about the risks of using this drug.

XXTell your veterinarian and pharmacist about any medication side effects (including allergic reactions, lack of appetite, diarrhea, itching, hair loss) your pet has developed in the past.

When should this medication not be used or be used very carefully?

No drug is 100% safe in all patients, but your veterinarian will discuss with you any specific concerns about using this drug in your animal.

This drug SHOULD NOT be used in:
XXAnimals that are allergic to praziquantel, pyrantel pamoate, or

febantel.

XXCats. Febantel is not as well tolerated in cats and the amount of pyrantel in the product is not enough to effectively treat cats for intestinal parasites.

XXAnimals that are pregnant.
If your pet has any of these conditions or signs, talk to your veteri-

narian about the potential risks versus benefits.

What are the side effects of this medication?

When given by mouth side effects are rare.

Side effects that are not serious include:

XXLoss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea.

You don’t have to be overly concerned if you see any of these unless they are severe, worsen, or continue to be a problem. Contact your veterinarian if this happens.

If my pet gets too much of this medication (an overdose), what should I do?

If you witness or suspect an overdose, contact your veterinarian or an animal poison control center for further advice. Animal poison control centers that are open 24 hours a day include: Pet Poison HELPLINE (855-764-7661) and ASPCA Animal Poison Control Cen- ter (888-426-4435); a consultation fee is charged for these services.

How should this medication be given?

For this medication to work, give it exactly as your veterinarian has prescribed. It’s a good idea to always check the prescription label to be sure you are giving the drug correctly.

XXThe drug may be given either with food or on an empty stomach. If your animal vomits shortly after getting the dose, contact your veterinarian for instructions. Do not withhold food after treating.

XXMake sure that your animal swallows all of the medication.

XXYour veterinarian may recommend that you repeat the treatment a few weeks later to make sure all of the parasites have been eliminated.

XXWatch your animal for a few minutes after giving the medication to make sure the entire treatment is swallowed.

XXIf you have difficulty getting your animal to take the medicine, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist for tips to help with dosing and reducing the stress of medication time.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.

What should I do if I miss giving a dose of this medication?

If you miss a dose, give it when you remember and then wait the amount of time between doses recommended by your veterinarian before giving another dose. Do not double-up or give extra doses.

How should I store this medication?

XXStore this medication in the original prescription bottle or an approved dosage reminder container (ie, pill minder) at room temperature and protected from light.

XXKeep away from children and other animals.
Can handling this medication be hazardous to me, my family, or

other pets?

There are no specific precautions required when handling this med- ication unless you are allergic to it. Wash your hands after handling any medication.

How should I dispose of this medication if I don’t use it all?

XXDo not flush this medication down the toilet or wash it down the sink. If a community drug “take-back” program is available, use this option. If there is no take-back program, mix the drug with coffee grounds or cat litter (to make it undesirable to children and animals and unrecognizable to people who might go through your trash), place the mixture in a sealable plastic bag to keep it from leaking out, and throw the bag out with the regular trash.

XXDo not save left over medication for future use or give it to others to use.

What other information is important for this medication?

XXFor most animals, the dead worms are digested; however, if your animal had many tapeworms, some may be seen in the feces.

XXUse of this drug may not be allowed in certain animal competitions. Check rules and regulations before entering your animal in a competition while this medication is being administered.

If you have any other questions or concerns about this medica- tion, contact your veterinarian or pharmacist.

©2017 PharmaVet, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Plumb’s® Veterinary Medication Guides have not been reviewed by FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.